Five Reasons to Attend the NAMI National Convention

  1. Learn exciting research, tools, treatment options and recovery strategies directly from experts
  2. Discover how to lead effective mental health advocacy efforts
  3. Hear relatable stories and make personal connections with powerful impact
  4. Find day-to-day support through coping strategies, health and wellness activities, and legal services
  5. Earn continuing education credits as a licensed counselor, social worker or registered nurse

The NAMI National Convention connects and inspires people with or affected by a mental illness who are looking for resources, research, support services and recovery strategies. Join this diverse, action-driven gathering of individuals with mental health conditions, family members and caregivers, policymakers, educators, researchers, clinicians, providers, exhibitors, sponsors and press this year in Washington, D.C.

The 
First-on-Board member rate of just $195 is only available until January 31.

To learn more about program offerings, CLICK HERE.

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Alcohol Use Disorder and the Loss of a Spouse

According to a recent study, the loss of a spouse due to divorce or death might be associated with an continuing risk of alcohol use disorder (“AUD”). According to the report’s authors, Kenneth Kendler, M.D., of Virginia Commonwealth University and colleagues:

“The pronounced elevation in AUD risk following divorce or widowhood, and the protective effect of both first marriage and remarriage against subsequent AUD, speaks to the profound impact of marriage on problematic alcohol use and the importance of clinical surveillance for AUD among divorced or widowed individuals”

The report is based on the records of close to a million married persons in Sweden. The study found a association with both a risk of a first AUD occurrence as well as AUD relapse, with a higher correlation in families with an AUD history, among other things. It also found a substantial decline in first AUD occurrences after divorce followed by a remarriage.

Widowhood also increased AUD risk in both sexes (hazard ratio of 3.85 in men and 4.10 in women). In women, widowhood had a stronger association with risk for future AUD if the spouse did not versus did have a lifetime history of AUD (hazard ratio of 3.69).

“These results suggest that it is not only the state of matrimony and the associated social roles that are protective against AUD. Rather, they are consistent with the importance of direct spousal interactions in which one individual monitors and tries to control his or her spouse’s drinking. A non-AUD spouse is likely to be much more effective at such control than a spouse with AUD.”

For more information, see:

San Gabriel Valley Frontline to Host Veteran Advocate February 7

San Gabriel Valley Frontline will host veteran Dustin Halliwell, MSW, a Veteran Advocate from the Los Angeles Vet Center. Learn how to recognize PTSD, gain a veteran’s perspective about how it feels, and learn how veterans, friends and family members can respond in healthy ways. Also, learn about Vet Centers and the services they offer for combat veterans and their families.

Dustin Halliwell served with the 75th Ranger Regiment from 2000-2004 as an automatic rifleman and machine gun team leader while serving as a Ranger. He served two tours in Iraq, and two tours in Afghanistan and earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology in 2008 from Cal State Long Beach, and a Master’s in Social Work in 2013 from USC. He works as a Veteran Advocate at the Los Angeles Vet Center.

DATE AND TIME
Tue, February 7, 2017
6:30 PM – 9:00 PM PST

LOCATION
The Legion Club of Pasadena
131 N. Marengo Ave.
Pasadena, CA 91101

The presentation is to be followed by a casual dinner and a chance to mix and mingle.Program and dinner are free. CLICK HERE for more information.

SGV Front Line is a community service program offered by NAMI SGV in partnership with the American Legion Family, Pasadena, Post 13.

Reminder: Meeting Tonight

Dr. Mary Read, M.D., Director of Adult Outpatient Program Harbor UCLA Medical Center will speak at our monthly meeting tonight, January 23, 2017, about the use of medication in psychiatry, an update on recent developments and will be an opportunity to “Ask the Doctor” about medications.

Dr. Read is interested in clinical, administrative and political issues as they affect the individual patient and the larger system of care. She has a particular interest in anxiety and psychotic disorders and is active in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) services at Harbor We are very fortunate to have Dr. Read speak to our group and am sure you will find it very informative and helpful.

See you tonight!

Screening of the animated short documentary film “Last Day of Freedom”

Friends of the Semel Institute is hosting a screening of the Academy Award™ nominated animated short documentary film, “Last Day of Freedom“, directed by Dee Hibbert-Jones and Nomi Talisman. The film is a portrait of a man at the nexus of the most pressing social issues of our day – veterans’ care, mental health access and criminal justice.

A discussion will follow the screening featuring Professor Elyn Saks: author of The Center Cannot Hold ; Orrin B. Evans Professor of Law, Psychology, and Psychiatry and the Behavioral Sciences at USC Gould School of Law and Director of the Saks Institute for Mental Health Law, Policy, and Ethics. Also joining the discussion will be Jim Preis, Executive Director, Mental Health Advocacy Services; Lecturer in Law, USC Gould School of Law; and Clinical Professor – Voluntary, UCLA Geffen School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences.

Dr. Andrew Leuchter, Professor of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at UCLA will moderate the discussion.

Friday, February 3
Melnitz Hall, UCLA
Check-in 6:30 PM   Program 7:00 PM
Admission is free but reservations are required.
Parking is available for $12 in Structure 3

Register

For questions email Wendy Kelman at
wkelman@mednet.ucla.edu

South Bay Homeless Count

A Point in Time Count of homeless neighbors in the South Bay will occur on Wednesday, January 25, 2017.  The purpose of the count is to assess the scope of homeless in the South Bay.  It is not to engage nor assist at this point but to provide information needed to address the problem.

As many of the homeless are persons with a mental illness, NAMI South Bay is working with the South Bay Coalition to End Homeless to recruit volunteers on this count.

For information on how to volunteer please go to www.theycountwillyou.org.

Monthly Meeting: January 23

 

Dr. Mary Read, M.D. Director of Adult Outpatient Program Harbor UCLA Medical Center will speak at our monthly meeting on Monday, January 23, 2017.

Please note that we will be meeting on the fourth Monday of the month instead of the third Monday because of the legal holiday on this coming Monday.

Dr. Read will be speaking about the use of medication in psychiatry, an update on recent developments and will be an opportunity to “Ask the Doctor” about medications. Dr. Read is interested in clinical, administrative and political issues as they affect the individual patient and the larger system of care. She has a particular interest in anxiety and psychotic disorders and is active in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) services at Harbor We are very fortunate to have Dr. Read speak to our group and am sure you will find it very informative and helpful

The Caring and Sharing Support Group will start at 6 PM and the Speaker Presentation will start at 7:30 PM at the First Lutheran Church 2900 Carson in Torrance.